Hal Ketchum & Bill Anderson Live! Plus Doyle Dykes & Matt King. Full Show!

Sensational evening at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, TN.  Hal Ketchum, Bill Anderson, Doyle Dykes and Matt King  perform some of their biggest hits. 

Hal Michael Ketchum (born April 9, 1953) is an American country music artist. He has released 11 studio albums since 1986, including nine for the Curb and Asylum-Curb labels. Ketchum's 1991 album Past the Point of Rescue is his most commercially successful, having been certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. Between 1991 and 2006 Ketchum had 17 entries on the Hot Country Songs charts. Three of his singles — "Small Town Saturday Night," "Past the Point of Rescue" and "Hearts Are Gonna Roll" — all reached number 2 on this chart, and three more charted within the Top Ten: "Sure Love" at number 3, and "Mama Knows the Highway" and "Stay Forever," both at number 8.

 

James William Anderson III (born November 1, 1937), known as Whisperin’ Bill Anderson, is an American country music singer, songwriter and television personality. He has been a member in long standing of the weekly Grand Ole Opry radio program and stage performance in Nashville, Tennessee, since 1961. He has released more than 40 studio albums and has reached No. 1 on the country charts seven times: "Mama Sang a Song" (1962), "Still" (1963), "I Get the Fever" (1966), "For Loving You" (with Jan Howard, 1967), "My Life (Throw It Away If I Want To)" (1969), "World of Make Believe" (1973), and "Sometimes" (with Mary Lou Turner, 1976). Twenty-nine more of his singles have reached the top ten.

 

One of the most successful songwriters in country music history, Anderson is also a popular singer, earning the nickname "Whisperin' Bill" for his soft vocal style and occasional spoken narrations.[1] Artists who have recorded his material include Ray Price, Wanda Jackson, Connie Smith, Lynn Anderson, Jim Reeves, Conway Twitty, Eddy Arnold, Roy Clark, Con Hunley, Lefty Frizzell, Brad Paisley, Kenny Chesney, and George Strait.

 

Bill Anderson had his own television show in the 1960s. Anderson has made several television appearances, including two stints as a game show host: The Better Sex (with co-host Sarah Purcell) in 1977, and the country music-themed quiz show Fandango (1983–1989) on The Nashville Network. He has also hosted an interview show called Opry Backstage and was a producer of a talent show called You Can Be a Star, hosted by fellow Opry member Jim Ed Brown, both shows on the former Nashville Network, and has made guest appearances on several other television series.

 

Anderson is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

 

Doyle Dykes (born May 23, 1954) is an American country acoustic guitarist from Jacksonville, Florida. He is influenced by a wide variety of musical styles and musicians such as Chet Atkins, Jerry Reed, Duane Eddy, to the Beatles and U2. Cited along with guitarists such as Tommy Emmanuel as one of the best fingerstyle guitarists in the world, he is also known for his capability of playing proficiently with a wide range of different guitar tunings. Some of his best-known works and interpretations are "Wabash Cannonball", "Country Fried Pickin'", "U2 Medley", "Be Still", "Amazing Grace" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". Dykes is a devout Christian and has served as a minister in a small church in Florida; the influence of Christianity is present in much of his work. He was a major endorser of Taylor Guitars and Rivera Sedona amplifiers, with his own signature models of each. In 2013 he began endorsing the Guild Guitar Company. Since 2015 he has touted his custom steel-fret Olson guitar as his "favorite guitar."

 

Matt King (born September 28, 1966) is an American country singer-songwriter. King was born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina. His mother, a real estate agent, played piano, and his father, who held jobs as an auctioneer, mason, and barber, played bluegrass guitar. Early in his career he was offered a position at Opryland USA after an audition. However, he was deep in debt at the time and had to turn down the offer because he could not afford to move. Some time later, in 1994, he relocated to Nashville, where he recorded demos and played locally. Producer Gary Morris heard him perform and got him an audition with Atlantic Records, who signed him and released his debut in 1997. Soon after he performed at the Grand Ole Opry in a Johnny Russell tribute, with Earl Scruggs, Roy Clark, Ricky Skaggs, and Vince Gill.

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